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The woman who knew too much

Guest blog by Barry Francis

If it had been left to the mainstream media, the conspiracy surrounding the assassination of John Kennedy and the massive cover up that followed might never have been revealed. It has taken the unheralded, and often ridiculed, research efforts of citizens like Mark Lane, James Hepburn, Josiah Thompson, David Lifton, Dick Russell and Jim Marrs, not to mention New Orleans DA James Garrison, among others to expose the monstrous evil behind America’s first and only coup d’état. The mysterious deaths of many who knew too much underscores the courage and determination of these citizen-patriots who set out to expose the convenient fabrications of the Warren Commission.

Now, the name Peter Janney, son of a career CIA operative, can be added to this distinguished list. Janney’s landmark book Mary’s Mosaic exposes the facts behind and reasons for the assassination of Kennedy’s lover Mary Pinchot Meyer. The book is exhaustively researched and beautifully written – aided by the fact that Janney personally knew Mary, her family members and many other principals in the case.

Janney gained access to the papers and notes of author Leo Damore (author of Senatorial Privilege) whose planned book on the Mary Meyer murder was never published due to his mysterious suicide. Damore had obtained a copy of Mary’s diary and had identified her killer.
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Mary Meyer was a beautiful, intelligent society woman, artist and mother. She was also a confidant, friend and lover of John Kennedy. At the time of her death she was divorced from Cord Meyer, a former peace activist who had gone over to the dark side with the CIA. She was brutally executed as she took her morning jog along the towpath alongside the Potomac river in Washington DC, just 11 months after the Kennedy assassination.

Reminiscent of the Kennedy assassination, within minutes a poor black “patsy” (Ray Crump) was identified and charged with her murder – despite little or no evidence of his guilt. The CIA’s fingerprints are all over this narrative and in fact the whole book. Fortunately, for Crump, the brilliant efforts of defense attorney Dovey Roundtree poked holes in the State’s case and got him acquitted. Rountree took the case pro-bono and financed expenses out of her own pocket. On his release, Crump gave her $1 in payment, representing two-thirds of his entire worth.

Janney outlines the lives and relationship of the ill-fated lovers whose paths first intersected as students during the 1930s and led to a serious partnership in the 1960s. He weaves the story of Mary’s life, loves and death through the geopolitical events of this period and shows the interconnection of those events.

Unfortunately for Mary, she was outspoken – a definite no-no for a CIA wife. She was also dabbling in drugs, including LSD, with JFK, Timothy Leary and the wives of important Washington power brokers and kept a diary covering her relationship with Kennedy (described as the “Hope Diamond” of the Kennedy assassination) and the “mosaic” she had put together on the assassination. In short, she knew too much and was liable to talk.

The book reads like a fiction thriller and contains a great deal of interesting information, some of which has not been published elsewhere, including:
• the name of Mary’s alleged CIA killer – William L. Mitchell;
• Mary’s brother-in-law, Ben Bradley, helped facilitate the cover up of Mary’s death and the subsequent disappearance of her diary;
• Mary’s role in, and support of, Kennedy’s bold peace initiatives with the Soviets;
• the suggestion that the CIA may have purposely brought down Gary Powers U2 spy plane in 1960 to scuttle President Eisenhower’s peace summit with Chairman Khrushchev;
• First hand information that, in April 1963, Vice-President Lyndon Johnson asked that he be given greater Secret Service security protection than the President (suggesting pre-knowledge of the assassination plot);
• JFK’s comment to his secretary Evelyn Lincoln three days before the assassination that his choice for running mate in 1964 “would not be Johnson;”
• The 1964 Moscow mission of Bill Walton on behalf of Bobby Kennedy to convey the Kennedy family’s true feelings about the assassination conspiracy and Bobby’s future plans to KGB man Georgi Bolshkov; and
• the publication of an editorial by former president Truman that appeared in the first edition of the Washington Post in December 1963 just one month after the assassination arguing, in effect, that the CIA was out of control and must be reigned in and restricted to its original mandate of intelligence gathering ─ rather than carrying out covert operations and making foreign policy. The piece indirectly implied that the CIA may have had something to do with the assassination. Shockingly, this important editorial was dropped from subsequent editions of the Post and was never picked up by any other media outlet.

Thankfully, Janney is not satisfied with simply telling Mary’s story and exposing the events surrounding her death. In a post script, he outlines his plans to campaign for a reopening of the Mary Meyer murder investigation which would compel the chief suspect in Mary’s murder to testify under oath. Let’s hope he’s successful, Mary deserves at least this much!

Barry Francis

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